Continuous Optical Monitoring of Cerebral Hemodynamics During Head-of-Bed Manipulation in Brain-Injured Adults

Authors: Kim MN, Edlow BL, Durduran T, Frangos S, Mesquita RC, Levine JM, Greenberg JH, Yodh AG, Detre JA.

INTRODUCTION: Head-of-bed manipulation is commonly performed in the neurocritical care unit to optimize cerebral blood flow (CBF), but its effects on CBF are rarely measured. This pilot study employs a novel, non-invasive instrument combining two techniques, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for measurement of CBF and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measurement of cerebral oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, to monitor patients during head-of-bed lowering.

METHODS:
Ten brain-injured patients and ten control subjects were monitored continuously with DCS and NIRS while the head-of-bed was positioned first at 30° and then at 0°. Relative CBF (rCBF) and concurrent changes in oxy- (ΔHbO2), deoxy- (ΔHb), and total-hemoglobin concentrations (ΔTHC) from left/right frontal cortices were monitored for 5 min at each position. Patient and control response differences were assessed.
RESULTS:
rCBF, ΔHbO2, and ΔTHC responses to head lowering differed significantly between brain-injured patients and healthy controls (P < 0.02). For patients, rCBF changes were heterogeneous, with no net change observed in the group average (0.3 ± 28.2 %, P = 0.938). rCBF increased in controls (18.6 ± 9.4 %, P < 0.001). ΔHbO2, ΔHb, and ΔTHC increased with head lowering in both groups, but to a larger degree in brain-injured patients. rCBF correlated moderately with changes in cerebral perfusion pressure (R = 0.40, P < 0.001), but not intracranial pressure.
CONCLUSION:
DCS/NIRS detected differences in CBF and oxygenation responses of brain-injured patients versus controls during head-of-bed manipulation. This pilot study supports the feasibility of continuous bedside measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics with DCS/NIRS and provides the rationale for further investigation in larger cohorts.

Full text and source: Springerlink

Neurocrit Care. 2013 May 8.